9 Life Changing Truths about Eternal Life

  1. Eternal life was promised before time began — “In hope of eternal life which God, who cannot lie, promised before time began” (Titus 1:2).
  2. Eternal life is a gift from God — “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (John 3:16). “And this is the testimony: that God has given us eternal life, and this life is in His Son” (1 John 5:11).
  3. Eternal life means our debt against God is paid in full — “…It is finished…” (John 19:30).
  4. Eternal life comes with forgiveness for all our sins: past, present, and future — “In whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins” (Col. 1:14).
  5. Eternal life means we are new creations — “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new” (2 Cor. 5:17).
  6. Eternal Life means Abundant life — “…I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly” (John 10:10).
  7. Eternal life comes with the promised seal of the Holy Spirit — “…having believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise,  who is the guarantee of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, to the praise of His glory” (Eph. 1:13–14).
  8. Eternal life means we are ambassadors for Christ — “Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were pleading through us: we implore you on Christ’s behalf, be reconciled to God” (2 Cor. 5:20).
  9.  Eternal life cannot be taken away — “And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand” (John 10:28).

(Note: This originally appeared here on EvanTell’s blog.)

Christmas Movie Lessons: Home Alone

The comedy Home Alone stars 8-year-old Keven McAlister (Macaulay Culkin), who accidentally gets left at home when his family goes to Paris for Christmas. Sounds a little improbable, right? But if you’ve watched the movie, you know that it only gets more improbable from there.

Kevin fights off Harry and Marv—two dimwitted burglars (Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern)—with death defying booby traps. We all winced when Marv stepped on a nail barefoot and probably begin to wonder if they were really human after Harry’s head got burned by a blowtorch. But in the midst of all its farcical humor, some spiritual elements creep in. Read more

Christmas Movie Lessons: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

“Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight,

At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more,

When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death,

And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.”

― C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Over the years, I’ve come to see Christmas in a new light. Magical to me as a child. Mixed feelings during parts of my adulthood. Now, a time of hope and waiting.

The people of God have long been familiar with the concept of waiting. After the prophet Malachi concluded his message from the Lord, it was 400 years before the advent of Jesus the Messiah. Read more

3 Things the Life of Daniel Teaches us about Troubled Times

From foreign rulers invading his home to keeping company with lions, the life of Daniel showcases God’s sovereign control. As the book of Daniel begins, King Nebuchadnezzar besieges Jerusalem and takes many of the young men back to Babylon, including Daniel.

Fast forward a few thousand years and we may not all face lions or invasion, but we do still struggle with a chaotic world.

How can believers learn from Daniel’s actions? Read more

What Christ’s Incarnation Means for Today

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While rereading the Christmas story, I’ve considered current events. The first Christmas wasn’t a pretty time either.

When the King of Heaven poured Himself into the womb of a virgin, He didn’t choose the richest mother. He chose a young girl whom Scripture suggests was among the poorest of the poor in Israel. A girl from Nazareth, the town where it was said “Nothing good comes out.” Read more

God’s Glory Found in Nature & Poetry

leaf_cropWhen the Old Testament speaks of God’s glory, it usually refers to a visible manifestation of God. For example, the stories of the tabernacle in Exodus or of Ezekiel’s vision of the temple, both expressing God’s intent to dwell among men.

But it’s also related to God’s self-disclosure to humanity. For example, the psalmist wrote, “The Heavens declare the glory of God” (19:1). Read more

Birthday Reflections on Time

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“So teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom.” (Psalm 90:12) 

Time’s a funny thing. We who keep close track of our age, and even the number of months of a baby’s life, may lose track of the time we spend perusing Pinterest or checking our newsfeed.

It’s not hard to track how many days have passed. But ideally our tracking should serve a purpose–gaining a heart of wisdom. Spurgeon puts it this way:

“Numeration is a child’s exercise in arithmetic, but in order to number their days aright the best of men need the Lord’s teaching.”

Why gain wisdom? To know best how to spend the gift of time. To God be the glory!

How to Understand 1 Timothy 2:11-12

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In yesterday’s post, I took a look at how a few different Bible versions translate 1 Timothy 2:11–12. They all had subtle differences partly due to the fact that it’s a challenging passage to translate and perhaps also due to the fact that there are several strong opinions on what this verse means.

Let’s take a closer look at these verses. For sake of simplifying the discussion, I’ll use the ESV text: “Let a woman learn quietly with all submissiveness. I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet.” Read more

Comparing Various Bible Translations for 1 Timothy 2:11–12

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In my last post, I talked about how comparing various Bible translations can help show us areas where there may be disagreement between scholars.

The second chapter of 1 Timothy is probably one of the hardest passages to translate in the New Testament. Let’s look specifically at 1 Timothy 2:11–12. Read more