Book Release: Vindicating the Vixens

I am so excited to announce that this month Vindicating the Vixens: Revisiting Sexualized, Vilified, and Marginalized Women of the Bible comes out! Dr. Sandra Glahn serves as the General Editor and a diverse group of 16 scholars contributed. Chapter 4, on Bathsheba, is written by yours truly.

Earlier this year, five of us authors participated on a panel moderated by Dr. Glahn during chapel at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can watch the video below:

Review of the Article “What You Need to Know About Bathsheba”

Recently, fellow Moody Alumna Dalaina May wrote a blog article for the Junia Project on “What You Need to Know About Bathsheba.” It’s often hard to find positive things about Bathsheba (or much on her at all for that matter), so I wanted to highlight some of the things I appreciated in Dalaina’s article:

  • An Acknowledgment of Bathsheba as the victim—She points out that Bathsheba was not an adulteress but instead the victim of a “power rape” and rightly points out that the biblical author places the full blame for the immoral incident on King David (for more support of this point, see my earlier blog article “Bathsheba’s Story (Part 1): How I Changed My Perspective.”
  • An Acknowledgment of Bathsheba’s profound influence on Jewish and Christian history—We don’t always talk about the positive influence Bathsheba had on her son Solomon. For example, many scholars believe Lemuel’s tribute to his mother in Proverbs 31 is tribute made by Solomon to his mother Bathsheba. In sum, Bathsheba’s voice played an important part in history.
  • An Acknowledgment that your role in society does not limit how God uses you—Bathsheba was a victim, but her influence was long lasting. I love Dalaina’s concluding line, “Even though the stories of powerful women often go unnoticed, God used women to usher in his kingdom throughout scripture. He still does.”

Bathsheba’s Story and Implications for Ministry (Part 3)

In contemplating Bathsheba’s lack of responsibility, many current observations and applications call for attention. Earlier this week, I took a look at Rachel Marie Stone’s perspective based off an article she wrote for Prism Magazine. In yesterday’s post, I looked at Chole Sun’s perspective. Today, I want to take a look at some things pointed out by Heather Celoria. (The following is content taken from my Master’s thesis written for Dallas Theological Seminary.) Read more

Bathsheba’s Story and Implications for Ministry (Part 2)

In contemplating Bathsheba’s lack of responsibility, many current observations and applications call for attention. In yesterday’s post, I took a look at Rachel Marie Stone’s perspective based off an article she wrote for Prism Magazine. Today I want to take a look at another interesting angle from Chole Sun. (The following is content taken from my Master’s thesis written for Dallas Theological Seminary.) Read more

Bathsheba’s Story and Implications for Ministry (Part 1)

In contemplating Bathsheba’s lack of responsibility, many current observations and applications call for attention. Practically speaking, some countries today have laws in place to protect minors from sexual abuse that go beyond what the Old Testament mandated.

For example, the organization RAINN stipulates boundaries concerning a person’s age, capacity to consent, and agreement to an act.[1] Bathsheba did not have the same legal recourse as many individuals have today. Yet, despite the increase in protective legislation, abuse and suppression still remain. Some Christian leaders abuse their power in sexual relationships. Others continue to put part of the blame on victims instead of the abuser, perhaps even more so in cases where the abuser is in a leadership position. What might be done to change this and give victims a greater voice? I want to share a portion from my Master’s thesis written for Dallas Theolgical Seminary on Rachel Marie Stone’s perspective. Read more

Thoughts on Misunderstood Women (and Men) in the Bible

This past week I’ve posted some stories about misunderstood women of the Bible: Mary Magdalene, Jephthah’s daughter, Bathsheba, and the Woman at the Well.

A friend of mine kindly pointed out that I hadn’t done any posts recently about men in the Bible and that my blog might be more balanced if I included some male characters. I thought he might have a decent point, so I begin to think about what I could say about other stories. But I ran into a few problems… Read more

Mary Magdalene’s Legacy

mary magdalene

Mary Magdalene is another Bible character whose name seems to create all kinds of fanciful assertions and controversies. One need only peruse well known books of the past decade such as Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code to hear that Mary Magdalene married Jesus and bore his children, and the Catholic church tried to cover this up.

Or, look at claims by the Western church that Mary Magdalene made a living as a prostitute. Poor woman. As if being possessed by seven demons wasn’t enough, she gets remembered in tradition and depicted in artwork as a remorseful woman of sin.

Yet, neither the claim of her being a prostitute nor of her marriage to Jesus have any shred of substantial proof. Read more

Mary Magdalene: First Apostle

 Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’”  Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”—and that he had said these things to her. John 20:17–18 (ESV)

To Read: John 20:1–18

Biblical Synopsis: Mary Magdalene stayed by Jesus’ side during his death and burial. After he was risen, she found his tomb empty and assumed his body had been stolen. But Jesus appeared to Mary near the tomb and told her to proclaim the good news of his resurrection! Read more

Jephthah’s Daughter

jephthah

People love drama and scandalous stories, even at times reading scandal into stories when it’s unwarranted. For example, seeing Bathsheba as seducing a king or the woman at the well as immoral, failing to see these women as victims. But sometimes the reverse is true with a bible character. We view a person as a victim of a huger atrocity than what really happened—as with Jephthah’s daughter. Read more

Bathsheba’s Bath

bathsheba

When I did research on Bathsheba for my thesis, a few people asked me why she was bathing outside, and some thought she was even bathing on top of a roof.

This month’s issue of Today in the Word from Moody addresses a similar question about Bathsheba: “Shouldn’t Bathsheba share a part of the blame in David’s moral failure in 2 Samuel 11 since she was bathing outside, attracting David’s attention?”

I was very pleased with Dr. Winfred Neely’s adamant response that Bathsheba was a victim and shared no part of the blame. Far too often I’ve seen her receive partial blame for King David’s sinful actions.

Here is a short exert from the fourth chapter of my thesis, which explains a few reasons why Bathsheba’s bathing does not not make her responsible in any way for David’s sin. Read more